Since so much of our work is about repurposing content from on air to online it's important to understand the differences between the two audiences and how they consume media.

 online vs on air lead

Thinking about the different ways people consume media is the starting point for thinking about what content you put where. It may seem obvious but it is worth thinking about the difference between the two platforms and how they might affect your content.

Take a look at just a few of the differences below:

Radio Audiences Online Audiences
Listen often at the same time and place e.g. car Tune in when they like - could be regular but not necessarily
Like predictability Often looking for something new

Often have the radio on in the background

Often listening 100%
Can tune in halfway through something Always listen from the beginning
Want to know who you are talking to or what song is playing Know who they are listening to and what song is playing because they can read it

So how might this affect the way we make content for both platforms?

Whilst some things are totally adaptable between platforms, there really is a difference in the way people tune into us on air and download us online. On air, someone could easily tune into something halfway through, that's why we push the idea of back-announcing and regular station or program IDs.

Whereas someone listening to a podcast doesn't need to be told every 15 minutes who they are listening to - after all they went to a website and found the podcast and downloaded it knowing who the presenter and possibly even the guests are.

With online audio, the key to its success is actually the graphics and text you put online to accompany it. What doesn't work is putting audio online and saying its "the next episode of (name of program)"- something we see far too often on radio station's websites.

Best practice would be to include enough detail about what is in the audio piece to get someone to click and download. You should include a bit about the guests and the topic at the very least. 

Take a look at the examples on from NPR's podcast Code Switch. See how the episode names and descriptions make you want to listen. 

npr code switch

                                               

Radio Audience

Online Audience

listen often at the same time and place eg car

tune in when they like - could be regular but not necessarily

like predictability

often looking for something new

often have the radio on in the background

often listening 100%

can tune in halfway through something

always listen from the beginning

want to know who you are talking to or what song is playing

know who they are listening to and what song is playing because they read it